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20121121
20121129
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CSPAN 6
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
don't care how anybody looks at it. >> reporter: we first met wal-mart employee dan hindman earlier this week. a sales associate in electronics he was once the employee of the month. but today he walked off his job to protest what he says are wal-mart's low wages and high health insurance premiums. so what do you think you're risking by being out here today? >> i'm not worried about the risk. i'm protected. i have a right to stand up for what's right and so does everyone else. >> reporter: it's that "everyone else" that has wal-mart suspicious. the company says few of the demonstrators were actually striking employees but outside people pressuring the company to unionize. >> in many of those locations no wal-mart associates took place. we had roughly the same number of call ins than we had last year. >> reporter: while there were a handful of arrests, wal-mart said the protest had no effect on black friday sales. in fact, the company said it was the best black friday on record. dan hindman says it's time, though, that the employees get rewarded for at least some of wal-mart's succes
? why then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- you're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking enough on the spending side. there seems to be movement toward the idea that some people's taxes will go up at the high end. middle class won't see much of a tax increase. why the optimism? are we justified? >> well, i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and our other guests here. the typical median income is $60,000 a year for a family. they're not getting a lot of money from capital gains and dividends. they're not freaked out at the prospect of those going up. they're concerned about what is in their paycheck. paychecks are morsteady than they had been any time the last few years. wages are going up a little bit. the biggest asset that anybody owns is a house. we finally seem -- it's not just the value of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with every passing week, you know, certain number of people underwater on their mortgages are now in
. our dan lothian is watching the comings and goings at the white house. and at some point, dan, congress is going to have to either come together on this and work with the president on this, and yet we're seeing all these various different meetings all around the communities and the country. it looks like there's a particular strategy that's playing out when it comes to the president right now. >> reporter: that's right. a lot of negotiations have taken place in the staff -- on the staff level. the president himself did speak with speaker john boehner on the phone over the weekend. there was that meeting with the lawmakers, the leadership just before the president went overseas on his southeast asia trip. but so far, no additional meetings that we know of on the schedule for the president to sit down with congressional leadership to try to hammer this out. i can tell you that i spoke with an administration official who told me that treasury secretary timothy geithner will be playing a leading role in these live in negotiation negotiations -- fiscal cliff negotiations. gene spel
in this recovery. >> then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- we're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking it up on the spending side. we've agreed -- we haven't agreed but there seems to be a movement toward the idea that some taxes will go up on the high end and the middle class won't see much of a tax increase. are we justified? >> i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and the other guests there. the typical consumer makes about $60,000 a year for their family. they're not getting tax dividends so they're not freaked up about those going up. they're concerned about their paychecks and paychecks have been more steady for the first time in several years, wages have gone up a little bit, and the biggest asset people own is a house. it's not just a volume of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with every passing week, a certain number of people who are under water on their mortgages are now in positive territory. and that contributes to what we call
, nearly 11 million women in the u.s. are on the pill. gynecologists dan grossman's research led to today's recommendation that oral contraceptives be made available over the counter to reduce the risk of unwanted pregnancies. >> we have over 50 years of experience with oral contraceptives now and it's one of the best studied medications that's around so we know it's incredibly safe. >> reporter: about half of all pregnancies are unintended-- a rate that has not changed in 20 years. nearly five million women considered at-risk for an unintended pregnancy do not use any kind of birth control. >> women who aren't currently use any type of contraception or who are using a less-effective method might start using the pill. and also it could make the pill easier to get for women who are already taking it and prevent gaps in use. >> reporter: ann mahan is a >> reporter: ann mahan is a registered nurse and director of the student health clinic at farleigh dickinson health clinic in new jersey. she has concerns about the recommendation. >> i can see chaos from birth control pills being over the co
is dan henning. >> good morning. >> john: it was a pretty slow news week. >> yeah nothing to talk about. >> john: the violence in the middle east, the action of various governors to undermine the affordable health care act, the um coming thanksgiving and black friday, and elmo leaving sesame street, which is a pretty painful thing for all if you have a kid. >> uh-huh. >> john: but i'm really thrilled to be here on the eve of thanksgiving, i'm thankful for shows like this. we're going to talk about black friday and the real history of thanks give as well. and really a tough question i want to ask everyone listening progressive and conservative to call in on this we know all of the horrible things of black friday, that it takes the christmas message of jesus and his anti-materialism message and completely, well makes a joke out of it. thanks giving is a time when christians buy lots of material possessions to celebration though guy who denounced material processions. we all know how about how these prices are jacked up and then put on sale, we know all of the bad
could be the decisive factor in winning over business. dan simon, cnn, san francisco. with the adt after thanksgiving sale. get adt home security and home management starting at just $99. that's a savings of $300. plus 15% off accessories. call now or visit adtpulse.com/tv. sale ends midnight november 27th. more than a security system, adt can help you turn on a few lights. bring family in from the cold. even let you know when an old friend has arrived. get the advanced technology of adt and save $300. starting at $99 installed. pulse save on accessories. call now or visit adtpulse.com/tv. sale ends midnight november 27th. humans -- sometimes life trips us up. and sometimes, we trip ourselves up, but that's okay. at liberty mutual insurance we can "untrip" you as you go through your life with personalized policies and discounts when you need them most. just call... and speak with a licensed representative about saving on your policy when you get married, move into a new house... [crash!] or add a car to your policy. don't forget to ask about saving up to 10% when you combine your auto an
game with an eye toward offering same day delivery. but there is a trade-off. dan simon looks at what all this means for you and your local stores. >> reporter: online versus brick and mortar. the battle for your holiday dollars perhaps has never been so intense. for years, internet merchants like amazon had a key advantage in states like california. no sales tax. local bookstores already under pressure by the rapid rise of ebooks and large bookstore ch n chains feel flar lparticularly squeezed. >> if you can save 10%, why wouldn't you? >> reporter: amazon's tax advantage recently disappeared in california adding 7% to 10% to the cost of each order. it also began taxing this year in other states like pennsylvania and texas. online retailers collect tax only for states where they have a physical presence. now here in california, amazon is building two giant warehouses. including this one near los angeles. it is a million square feet, and for the old-fashioned retailers, it is another reason to worry. why? because amazon's goal is to get items to customers faster and to be able to offe
. maybe they are on an iphone or dan android pc. you want to give each person the best possible handful of pieces of content for them at that time. that is a growing problem. it is during free quickly and we believe it is important to solve. there is a bunch of machine learning, a bunch of infrastructure to assemble for each person. one thing i think about this is your publishing for each of $1 billion ever met. in needs to stab today. there is a model that tries to project is most likely to get air active with optimizing -- news feed optimizes what they would like to interact with. what will create a consumer of between the publisher and consumer? that is the high level. >> you think about how that system works for. lettis positive feedback. you'll get more of that thing. how do you tweak the algorithms so people ill don't show up -- it is a personalized newspaper. how do you now the difference between how they interact. people want to have both interactive, one more often but they want to see the other one and check it out occasionally. >> the main thing we rely on there is people. on
to dan gillerman, well known ambassador in israel. he said the only way it will end is stamp out hamas. can that really be done? >> first of all i agree with the ambassador. i think he is spot on. with the ideology they have that calls for the destruction of israel the only way you are going to defeat them is actually get them on the ground. now that is going to be very challenging because a lot of them have a backdoor to go into egypt. with president morsi being a muslim brotherhood, he is supporting them, although he played a key role in this truce. the fact is to stop this from happening they are going to have to destroy hamas. >> gregg: hamas will rearm with iranian made rockets and other weapons that are smuggled in through gaza through sudan and egypt. egypt says, of course, and did just several days -- we'll that i can sure they don't rearm. you don't believe that, do you? >> not at all. egypt has been letting them come through the corridor and their part of the problem. when we had mubarek there, he was pretty good about cutting the flow of weapons. that is one of new challenge
down and dan rather stepping in. i think there was competition. there was jealousy. there was envy. uncomfortable about walter having stepped down and dan rather stepping in. i think there was competition. there was jealousy. there was envy. i think on walter's part there was some regret. he was such a young man to leave that job. he was such an icon even in his own day. what made me excited was that, through all of that, the reportg did not change at all. in some ways, it gradually did start to change at cbs. but, for me, i could not believe it. i felt like these people were so professional. i was scared to death. that is a good thing, i think, that you feel like you have a lot of experience and you have done a lot of reporting and producing and you understand television news, but you are surrounded people who are really good and challenge you. i love that. i felt like i was able to learn some of the more traditional values you will at the school that started in our building. i will talk about those a little bit as we go. i also got very fortunate because i ended up overseas withi
of what moral envision as dan pointed out in his chapter in the book he had edited commemorating the passage of the morel act that we're celebrating the 150th anniversary this year, and say his vision was for liberal education as well as toll tal yaren and as the american research university e americaed from the classical -- and the science and technology certainly science and technology draws more federal support, but without the humanities and -- there is just absolutely extraordinary work being done in the humanities which informs our intellectual culture, it's pervasive, i think it's just not as -- it doesn't produce the breakthrough technology as you said that the nano technology cousin. >> do the panelists think that the humanities are getting the short end of the stick. are they just jealous of the new buildings for the engineering college? >> i think that there's no question they feel downtrodden. in reality, if you look at the fundamental purpose of the university education, although we have the vocational focus right now sometimes said that the purpose of the college ed
in the air. people were still uncomfortable about walter having stepped down and dan rather stepping in. i think there was competition. there was jealousy. there was envy. i think on walter's part there was some regret. he was such a young man to leave that job. he was such an icon even in his own day. what made me excited was that, through all of that, the culture of storytelling and reporting did not change at all. in some ways, it gradually did start to change at cbs. but, for me, i could not believe it. i felt like these people were so professional. i was scared to death. that is a good thing, i think, that you feel like you have a lot of experience and you have done a lot of reporting and producing and you understand television news, but you are surrounded people who are really good and challenge you. i love that. i felt like i was able to learn some of the more traditional values you will at the school that started in our building. i will talk about those a little bit as we go. i also got very fortunate because i ended up overseas within about three years. based in london. i recommen
itself and jim brown, the nfl legendary, the legendary nfl running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you will of course are familiar with. he is the chief of neurosurgery and ch
and dan rather stepping in. i think there was competition and jealousy, and the. i think on walter's part there was some regret. he he was such an icon even in his own day. what made me excited was that, through all of that, the culture of storytelling and reporting did not change at all. in some ways, it gradually did start to change at cbs. but, for me, i could not believe it. i felt like these people were so professional. i was scared to death. that is a good thing, i think, that you feel like you have a lot of experience and you have done a lot of reporting and producing and you understand television news, but you are surrounded people who are really good and challenge you. i love that. i felt like i was able to learn some of the more traditional values you will at the school that started in our building. i will talk about those a little bit as we go. hi also got very fortunate because i ended up overseas within about three years. .ased in london i recommend it highly for students. think about an international assignment. there are very few things as challenging. people do not know, c
running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you will of course are familiar with. he is the chief of neurosurgery and chairman of the department of surgery and drifter of services of
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)